Exhibited at the Estonian Print and Paper Museum as an audio-visual installation, Alphabet explores the malleable/recyclable characteristics of information and the numerous iterations one set of data can take.
Inspiration for the project comes from what can be regarded as the earliest type of computer programme - the punch cards inputted into the Jacquard Loom (first demonstrated in 1801), which formed a binary code to tell the loom what to weave.
The process begins with a single length of ribbon - woven onto itself to form a grid. This grid is used as a rudimentary canvas onto which an image is printed. By then unweaving the grid, the marks which compose the image are deconstructed, abstracted into a series of stains, a pattern of untouched and painted thread. By wrapping or weaving the ribbon into new patterns, the marks of the image are re-ordered into new aesthetic configurations, something which is akin to a computer glitch, but through an evident physical process.
These configurations then become the basis for an additional process which allows for a more provocative re-imagining of the original information. By weaving the string into a series of horizontal lines, and taking the height of the line and length of the stain to be the pitch and duration of a note respectively; the marks become a musical score. Instead of simply changing the way the viewer visually reads the original marks - it is possible to change the sense with which they experience them.
The resulting soundscape (which can be heard here: https://soundcloud.com/petevance/ alphabet) fills a room into which the various artifacts from these processes are placed. An alphabet of printing blocks on the floor allude to the fact that everything the viewer is seeing and hearing originates from something they fully understand and comprehend. Coupled with a minimal exhibition text, which mirrors the procedural nature of the work in its instructional format, the entirety of what has been done and the ramifications of it are made apparent.
Alphabet is the most recent work in a practice which, despite being varied in its aesthetics, is unified in its investigative nature and focus on how information and language can be recorded or manipulated. How through transformative processes, the ordinary or overlooked can be presented as something new – something to be contemplated.

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